Tag Archives: China employment

The Newbies Complain So Much

Rober Parkinson, the founder and CEO of RMG Selection has been invited by EASY fm to attended the RoundTable to talk about The Newbies Complain So Much by CRIezfm.
Topic1 Skilled Labor Jobs VS White Collar Jobs It seems that China has entered the skilled worker era. Recently there’ve been numerous reports that seem to suggest that skilled workers earn more than white collar workers. A typical construction worker in China is earning more than 10,000RMB a month which is higher than many white collar jobs whose monthly salary is 6,000RMB a month in average. What exactly does the word skill workers encompass? Is there a talent shortage for these occupations? Topic2 New Employee Satisfaction Renren.com released a report on new employee satisfaction, which shows that these newbies only have 24.68% satisfaction rate about their starting salaries. 30% think they’re earning less than people in starting positions in other companies of the same industry. Why are they not satisfied? Have slowing economy and inflation result in decreasing salaries? Or is it normal for new employees to complain about salary? Topic3 Taobao Art Auction Buying clothes or electronic products online is no longer news. But have you ever tried bidding for art works online? Both domestic and international auction houses have held online auctions of artworks in recent weeks. Debates on the advantages and disadvantages of this form of auctioning are heating up. Is it getting more popularity? Topic4 SF Express Uses Drones A Dongguan netizen said on his microblog that he saw a UFO on his way home and later discovered that was drone aircraft operated by S.F. Express, a major Chinese express delivery company. S.F. Express later admitted to the media that it is experimenting using drones to deliver packages to customers in remote areas in the future, but so far the drone is only for use within the company and will not have direct contact with customers. Is it for everyone? Topic5 Social Commerce App When girls buy pretty things, many of them like to show off to their friends. This is how social commerce works. Vancl Star has been around as a web app for a while, and this weekend launched as a mobile app for Android, with an iOS version in the works. Is it a good idea to mix social media with e-commerce? – See more at: http://english.cri.cn/4926/2013/09/06/1561s786332.htm  

Logistics & Shipping Industry: Build your Sales Team beyond the Client List

China’s Shipping & Logistics industry is hungry. Whether they are Global Top 10 or medium-sized, every carrier and freight forwarder is looking for the same talent: Excellent sales people to get ahead of competitors.

A regular used measurement for a good sales person is the ownership of direct business, summarized as a client list. This list of yearly/monthly shipments is often regarded as the “hard skill” of a sales person. The quality of this list often decides whether an offer is extended or not. But how relevant is a client list for the hiring decision?

For a sales people, an employer is a platform to develop new business. A sales person depends on the operational strength of the company. A job change would be a rational option only when the new employer provides a better platform for the candidate’s current and future business partners.

Thus, the client list is only relevant when the hiring company can provide a stronger platform (operations, customer service, shipping rates etc.) than the candidate’s current company. If not, the candidate’s clients would have little incentive to transfer. This may leave the candidate empty handed.

Rather than merely looking at the candidate’s current shipments, companies should recruit sales people fitting their own strengths and weaknesses. Companies should realize that only a small proportion of sales persons would actually be qualified for their business niches. Consequently, it becomes incrementally important to have your selling points ready to attract those truly value adding sales people.

 Ruben Van Den Boer Consultant and Logistic specialist at RMG Selection      

Logistics & Shipping Industry: Build your Sales Team beyond the Client List

Control-Your-Sales-Team

China’s Shipping & Logistics industry is hungry. Whether they are Global Top 10 or medium-sized, every carrier and freight forwarder is looking for the same talent: Excellent sales people to get ahead of competitors.

A regular used measurement for a good sales person is the ownership of direct business, summarized as a client list. This list of yearly/monthly shipments is often regarded as the “hard skill” of a sales person. The quality of this list often decides whether an offer is extended or not. But how relevant is a client list for the hiring decision?

For a sales people, an employer is a platform to develop new business. A sales person depends on the operational strength of the company. A job change would be a rational option only when the new employer provides a better platform for the candidate’s current and future business partners.

Thus, the client list is only relevant when the hiring company can provide a stronger platform (operations, customer service, shipping rates etc.) than the candidate’s current company. If not, the candidate’s clients would have little incentive to transfer. This may leave the candidate empty handed.

Rather than merely looking at the candidate’s current shipments, companies should recruit sales people fitting their own strengths and weaknesses. Companies should realize that only a small proportion of sales persons would actually be qualified for their business niches. Consequently, it becomes incrementally important to have your selling points ready to attract those truly value adding sales people.

 Ruben Van Den Boer Consultant and Logistic specialist at RMG Selection      

The changing nature of the Logistics & Shipping Industry – Asia’s @ the Centre

Logistics & shipping, one of the world’s most turbulent and fast-changing industries, highly dependent on global economic situations and international relationships.

Many of you might (maybe nostalgically) remember how Rotterdam, once unarguably the world’s largest port, in just a few years (2004-2007) was overtaken by Shanghai, Ningbo, Singapore and Shenzhen while closely followed by Qingdao, Guangzhou and Tianjin. With Asia as the rising star, the sky was the limit for the global logistics industry. Nothing but a major economic disaster could stop an ongoing exponential growth. And guess what happened…

After 2008, the industry became less optimistic. Third party logistics, from origin a European and American invention, is now witnessing a diminishing world demand, while competition remains stiff and heavily price-oriented. With a double digit growth in ocean freight forwarding in 2012, things might not be as hopeless as many industrial professionals claim it to be. However, it is clear that market conditions have changed and it is now up to the industry to show her flexibility.

The major challenge for the Logistics&shipping industry during this economic downturn is not so much surviving but rather adapting to changing global circumstances. The future remains uncertain, but current trends start to unveil the new global 3PL platform e.g.:

  • The rise of Intra-Asia as a major trade area.
  • The emergence of China as a mature consumer market with domestic production and sales.
  • The transfer of production sites to West China and other countries in SE Asia.
  • The remarkable growth of trade amongst developing countries.
  • China’s proactive overseas investment strategy including large-scale infrastructure projects in Africa, South America and Asia..
  • The increasing global popularity of Chinese brands such as COFCO, Huawei and Lenovo.

Many industrial players already started to adapt; investing in new trade lanes, project services and warehousing&transportation within Asia. These new trends by no means indicate that Western-based companies should abandon their home-advantage and go all-in for Asia. However, China already has become the second market for most forwarders and carriers, while for many it will be hard to deny that China has become their single largest cash cow.

Ruben van den BoerLogistics Recruitment Specialist, RMG Selection   ruben.boer@rmgselection.com or beijing@rmgselection.com or call +86 10 5896 2288.

The changing nature of the Logistics & Shipping Industry – Asia's @ the Centre

Logistics & shipping, one of the world’s most turbulent and fast-changing industries, highly dependent on global economic situations and international relationships.

Many of you might (maybe nostalgically) remember how Rotterdam, once unarguably the world’s largest port, in just a few years (2004-2007) was overtaken by Shanghai, Ningbo, Singapore and Shenzhen while closely followed by Qingdao, Guangzhou and Tianjin. With Asia as the rising star, the sky was the limit for the global logistics industry. Nothing but a major economic disaster could stop an ongoing exponential growth. And guess what happened…

After 2008, the industry became less optimistic. Third party logistics, from origin a European and American invention, is now witnessing a diminishing world demand, while competition remains stiff and heavily price-oriented. With a double digit growth in ocean freight forwarding in 2012, things might not be as hopeless as many industrial professionals claim it to be. However, it is clear that market conditions have changed and it is now up to the industry to show her flexibility.

The major challenge for the Logistics&shipping industry during this economic downturn is not so much surviving but rather adapting to changing global circumstances. The future remains uncertain, but current trends start to unveil the new global 3PL platform e.g.:

  • The rise of Intra-Asia as a major trade area.
  • The emergence of China as a mature consumer market with domestic production and sales.
  • The transfer of production sites to West China and other countries in SE Asia.
  • The remarkable growth of trade amongst developing countries.
  • China’s proactive overseas investment strategy including large-scale infrastructure projects in Africa, South America and Asia..
  • The increasing global popularity of Chinese brands such as COFCO, Huawei and Lenovo.

Many industrial players already started to adapt; investing in new trade lanes, project services and warehousing&transportation within Asia. These new trends by no means indicate that Western-based companies should abandon their home-advantage and go all-in for Asia. However, China already has become the second market for most forwarders and carriers, while for many it will be hard to deny that China has become their single largest cash cow.

Ruben van den BoerLogistics Recruitment Specialist, RMG Selection   ruben.boer@rmgselection.com or beijing@rmgselection.com or call +86 10 5896 2288.

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